Marker-Free Indoor Localization and Tracking of Multiple Users in Smart Environments Using a Camera-Based Approach

  • Andreas Braun
  • Tim Dutz
  • Michael Alekseew
  • Philipp Schillinger
  • Alexander Marinc
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8028)

Abstract

In recent years, various indoor tracking and localization approaches for usage in conjunction with Pervasive Computing systems have been proposed. In a nutshell, three categories of localization methods can be identified, namely active marker-based solutions, passive marker-based solutions, and marker-free solutions. Both active and passive marker-based solutions require a person to carry some type of tagging item in order to function, which, for a multitude of reasons, makes them less favorable than marker-free solutions, which are capable of localizing persons without additional accessories. In this work, we present a marker-free, camera-based approach for use in typical indoor environments that has been designed for reliability and cost-effectiveness. We were able to successfully evaluate the system with two persons and initial tests promise the potential to increase the number of users that can be simultaneously tracked even further.

Keywords

Indoor localization Computer Vision Pervasive Computing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Braun
    • 1
  • Tim Dutz
    • 1
  • Michael Alekseew
    • 2
  • Philipp Schillinger
    • 2
  • Alexander Marinc
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research IGDDarmstadtGermany
  2. 2.Technische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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