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User Experience on Product Display Page: At Tmall.com

  • Jie Gao
  • Yujing Zeng
  • Xiaopeng Guo
  • Zhenghua Zhang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8015)

Abstract

This research focused on how buyers browse and make purchases on Tmall.com. Specifically, we explored how female buyers process information on the product description pages and how their behaviors are consequently affected. The study was composed of two sessions: an information sorting task and an online test. The purpose of the information sorting task was to explore how buyers prefer to see information presented on the product description page. We hypothesized that if the presentation of information on the product page was consistent with buyers’ expectations, then they would process the page faster which would facilitate their purchasing decisions. The purpose of the online test was to examine our hypothesis by measuring buyers’ purchasing tendencies. The online test results revealed that the modified pages improved sales.

Keywords

e-commerce online shopping product display discrepancy attribution fluency 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jie Gao
    • 1
  • Yujing Zeng
    • 1
  • Xiaopeng Guo
    • 1
  • Zhenghua Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.Taobao (China) Software Co., LTDHangzhouP.R. China

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