Advertisement

Social Movement Information Design and a Curriculum of Proper Knowledge Consumption

  • Gabriel Y. Schaffzin
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8012)

Abstract

Narrowing in on two contemporary social movements as a case study, this analysis will use a mainstay of information design, Edward Tufte, as well as a lesser-known pioneer in the field, Otto Neurath, to consider the ways in which the infographics associated with those movements can be looked at critically. Using Tufte’s popularity and commercial success as an indication of his strong influence on this field, questions about the appreciation of efficiency or validity of message at the expense of craft, nuance, and meaning making will be raised, eventually concluding that a new approach to the consumption of information design is necessary.

Keywords

Social Movement Information Design Graphic Design Cultural Hegemony Content Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    About Us|OccupyWallSt.org (2011), http://occupywallst.org/about/ (accessed December 9, 2011)
  2. 2.
    Aston, A.: Tufte’s Invisible Yet Ubiquitous Influence (June 10, 2009), http://businessweek.com/stories/2009-06-10/tuftes-invisible-yet-ubiquitous-influencebusinessweek-business-news-stock-market-and-financial-advice (accessed April 17, 2012)
  3. 3.
    Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (2010; 111th Congress; S. 3804) - GovTrack.us (September 20, 2010), http://govtrack.us/congress/bills/111/s3804 (accessed April 28, 2012)
  4. 4.
    Drenttel, W., Helfand, J.: Wonders Revealed: Design and Faux Science (October 14, 2002), http://chapters.aiga.org/resources/content/1/9/1/3/documents/AIGA_Clear_Wonders_Revealed.pdf (accessed April 16, 2012)
  5. 5.
    Flusser, V.: Towards a Philosophy of Photography, pp. 9–10. Reaktion, London (1983)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gadney, M., et al.: You are here (2012), http://eyemagazine.com/feature/article/you-are-here (accessed April 8, 2012)
  7. 7.
    Galvez, M., et al.: RB 196: The Rally Cry of SOPA (April 2, 2012), http://wilkins.law.harvard.edu/podcasts/mediaberkman/radioberkman/2012-03-30_SOPA.mp3 (accessed April 26, 2012)
  8. 8.
    Glaser, M., Mayer, P.: Introduction. In: Glaser, M. (ed.) Graphic Design, pp. 229–230. The Overlook Press, Inc., Woodstock (1973)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Greeley, R.A.: Richard Duardo’s ‘Aztlán’ poster: Interrogating cultural hegemony in graphic design. Design Issues 14(1), 21–34 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Higginbotham, S.: SOPA Media Coverage Dissected. Panel at SXSW Interactive 2012. Also ft. Bialer, Jake, Hart, Kim, and Stelter, Brian. Austin, TX (March 10, 2012)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Kindel, E.: Personal interview (August 9, 2012)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kinross, R.: The Transformer, p. 6. Hyphen Press, London (2009)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Klein, E.: You’re creating a vision of the sort of society you want to have in miniature (October 3, 2011), http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/youre-creating-a-vision-of-the-sort-of-society-you-want-to-have-in-miniature/2011/08/25/gIQAXVg7HL_blog.html
  14. 14.
    Lawler, R.: 500M Views in 5 Years: How TEDTalks Did It | Online Video News (June 27, 2011), http://gigaom.com/video/tedtalks-5-years/ (accessed October 8, 2012)
  15. 15.
    Lupton, E.: Reading Isotype. Design Issues 3(2), 47–58 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Margolin, V.: Rebellion, Reform, and Revolution: American Graphic Design for Social Change. Design Issues 5(1) (Autumn 1988)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Neurath, M., Kinross, R.: The Transformer: Principles of Making Isotype Charts, pp. 26, 75. Hyphen, London (2009)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Neurath, O.: International Picture Language; the First Rules of Isotype, pp. 12–15. K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co. Ltd., London (1936)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Occupy Design, http://occupydesign.org (accessed April 8, 2012)
  20. 20.
    Occupy SOPA-The movement to rid the world of the SOPA bill, http://occupysopa.org/ (accessed April 29, 2012)
  21. 21.
    Postman, N.: Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology, p. 142. Vintage Books, New York (1993)Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011 (S. 968) - GovTrack.us (May 11, 2012), http://govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/s968 (accessed April 28, 2012)
  23. 23.
    Schwartz, M.: Pre-Occupied. The origins and future of Occupy Wall Street (November 28, 2011), http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/11/28/111128fa_fact_schwartz (accessed December 9, 2011)
  24. 24.
    Shapley, D.: The da Vinci of Data (March 30, 1998), http://nytimes.com/1998/03/30/business/the-da-vinci-of-data.html (accessed April 26, 2012)
  25. 25.
    Slavkin, M.: Phone Interview (April 12, 2012)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    SOPA/PIPA: Internet Blacklist Legislation | Electronic Frontier Foundation, http://eff.org/issues/coica-internet-censorship-and-copyright-bill (accessed April 26, 2012)
  27. 27.
    Stop Online Piracy Act (H.R. 3261) - GovTrack.us (October 26, 2011), http://govtrack.us/congress/bills/112/hr3261(accessed April 28, 2012)
  28. 28.
    Tufte, E.: Beautiful Evidence, pp. 9, 122–139. Graphics Press, Cheshire (2006)Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Tufte, E.: The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edn. Graphics Press, Cheshire (2001)Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Wyatt, E.: Lines Drawn on Antipiracy Bills (December 14, 2011), http://nytimes.com/2011/12/15/technology/lines-are-drawn-on-legislation-against-internet-piracy.html (accessed April 28, 2012)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriel Y. Schaffzin
    • 1
  1. 1.Dynamic Media InstituteMassachusetts College of Art & DesignUSA

Personalised recommendations