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The Effects of Touch Screen Virtual Keyboard Key Sizes on Typing Performance, Typing Biomechanics and Muscle Activity

  • Jeong Ho Kim
  • Lovenoor S. Aulck
  • Ornwipa Thamsuwan
  • Michael C. Bartha
  • Christy A. Harper
  • Peter W. Johnson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8026)

Abstract

The goal of the present study was to determine whether different touch screen virtual keyboard key sizes affected typing productivity, typing forces, and muscle activity. In a repeated-measures laboratory experiment with 21 subjects, typing speed, accuracy, muscle activity, and typing forces were measured and compared between four different key sizes: 13x13, 16x16, 19x19, and 22x22 mm. The results showed that 13 mm keyboard had a 15% slower typing speed (p < 0.0001) and slightly higher static (10th %tile) shoulder muscle activity (2%, p = 0.01) as compared to the other keyboards with larger keys. The slower typing speed and slightly higher shoulder muscle activity indicated that 13 mm keyboard may be less optimal for touch typing compared to the larger key sizes.

Keywords

Virtual interface typing forces electromyography typing speed accuracy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeong Ho Kim
    • 1
  • Lovenoor S. Aulck
    • 2
  • Ornwipa Thamsuwan
    • 3
  • Michael C. Bartha
    • 4
  • Christy A. Harper
    • 5
  • Peter W. Johnson
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Environmental and Occupational Health SciencesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Department of BioeingeeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Industrial and Systems EngineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.Ergonomics Research and Development ProgramHewlett-PackardHoustonUSA
  5. 5.Personal Systems GroupHewlett-PackardHoustonUSA

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