MiniLEGO: Efficient Secure Two-Party Computation from General Assumptions

  • Tore Kasper Frederiksen
  • Thomas Pelle Jakobsen
  • Jesper Buus Nielsen
  • Peter Sebastian Nordholt
  • Claudio Orlandi
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7881)

Abstract

One of the main tools to construct secure two-party computation protocols are Yao garbled circuits. Using the cut-and-choose technique, one can get reasonably efficient Yao-based protocols with security against malicious adversaries. At TCC 2009, Nielsen and Orlandi [28] suggested to apply cut-and-choose at the gate level, while previously cut-and-choose was applied on the circuit as a whole. This idea allows for a speed up with practical significance (in the order of the logarithm of the size of the circuit) and has become known as the “LEGO” construction. Unfortunately the construction in [28] is based on a specific number-theoretic assumption and requires public-key operations per gate of the circuit. The main technical contribution of this work is a new XOR-homomorphic commitment scheme based on oblivious transfer, that we use to cope with the problem of connecting the gates in the LEGO construction. Our new protocol has the following advantages:

  1. 1

    It maintains the efficiency of the LEGO cut-and-choose.

     
  2. 2

    After a number of seed oblivious transfers linear in the security parameter, the construction uses only primitives from Minicrypt (i.e., private-key cryptography) per gate in the circuit (hence the name MiniLEGO).

     
  3. 3

    MiniLEGO is compatible with all known optimization for Yao garbled gates (row reduction, free-XORs, point-and-permute).

     

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Copyright information

© International Association for Cryptologic Research 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tore Kasper Frederiksen
    • 1
  • Thomas Pelle Jakobsen
    • 1
  • Jesper Buus Nielsen
    • 1
  • Peter Sebastian Nordholt
    • 1
  • Claudio Orlandi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceAarhus UniversityDenmark

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