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Workload-Aware Cache for Social Media Data

  • Jinxian Wei
  • Fan Xia
  • Chaofeng Sha
  • Chen Xu
  • Xiaofeng He
  • Aoying Zhou
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7808)

Abstract

The success of social network services has brought up many interesting Web 2.0 applications, while posed great challenges for human-real-time data management for huge volume of data with unstructured nature. Timeline query is a specific type of queries that are widely used in social network services and analysis. A workload-aware cache scheme for efficient evaluation of home timeline queries in human-real-time manner is proposed in this paper. It utilizes the communities within followship network and considers the high skew of access frequency across users to generate cache units. Thus, timeline queries are transformed to a process of merging cache units. Empirical studies show the superiority of overlapping cache strategy over other three existing strategies.

Keywords

Social Network Service Cache Strategy Shared Group Community Detection Algorithm Social Medium Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinxian Wei
    • 1
  • Fan Xia
    • 1
  • Chaofeng Sha
    • 1
  • Chen Xu
    • 1
  • Xiaofeng He
    • 1
  • Aoying Zhou
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Massive Computing, Software Engineering InstituteEast China Normal UniversityChina

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