A Non-invasive Multi-sensor Capturing System for Human Physiological and Behavioral Responses Analysis

  • Senya Polikovsky
  • Maria Alejandra Quiros-Ramirez
  • Takehisa Onisawa
  • Yoshinari Kameda
  • Yuichi Ohta
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7742)

Abstract

We present a new noninvasive multi-sensor capturing system for recording video, sound and motion data. The characteristic of the system is its 1msec. order accuracy hardware level synchronization among all the sensors as well as automatic extraction of variety of ground truth from the data. The proposed system enables the analysis of the correlation between variety of psychophysiological model (modalities), such as facial expression, body temperature changes, gaze analysis etc... . Following benchmarks driven framework principles, the data captured by our system is used to establish benchmarks for evaluation of the algorithms involved in the automatic emotions recognition process.

Keywords

sensor-fusion synchronization benchmarks 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Senya Polikovsky
    • 1
  • Maria Alejandra Quiros-Ramirez
    • 1
  • Takehisa Onisawa
    • 1
  • Yoshinari Kameda
    • 1
  • Yuichi Ohta
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of System and Information EngineeringUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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