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Cardiac Tumors

  • Joon-Won Kang
  • Tae-Hwan LimEmail author
Chapter
  • 2.3k Downloads

Abstract

The prevalence of cardiac tumors is very low, and the majority of cardiac tumors arise from metastasis. The majority of primary cardiac tumor is benign. Transthoracic echocardiography is widely used for initial evaluation or screening, and advances in cardiac imaging – cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) – provide additional information about the shape, location, and extent of cardiac tumors. CMR imaging, especially, is more advantageous because of its superior spatial resolution and characterization of tumor tissue and enhancement patterns of the tumor using gadolinium agent. In this chapter, we will describe the clinical aspects of cardiac tumors, recommended imaging strategies used in their acquisition, and present selected images of cardiac masses of various etiologies with a review of the imaging characteristics of each tumor type. We will also describe “tumor-like” lesions that can be mistaken as tumors.

Keywords

Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Infective Endocarditis Pericardial Effusion Cardiac Tumor Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Radiology and Research Institute of RadiologyAsan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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