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Interactive Training of Human Detectors

  • David Vázquez
  • Antonio M. López
  • Daniel Ponsa
  • David Gerónimo
Part of the Intelligent Systems Reference Library book series (ISRL, volume 48)

Abstract

Image based human detection remains as a challenging problem. Most promising detectors rely on classifiers trained with labelled samples. However, labelling is a manual labor intensive step. To overcome this problem we propose to collect images of pedestrians from a virtual city, i.e., with automatic labels, and train a pedestrian detector with them. The resulting detector performs correctly when such virtual-world data are similar to testing one, i.e., real-world pedestrians in urban areas. When testing data is acquired in different conditions than training ones, e.g., human detection in personal photo albums, dataset shift appears. In previous work, we treat this problem as one of domain adaptation and solve it with an active learning procedure. In this work, we focus on the same problem but evaluate a different set of faster to compute features, i.e., Haar, EOH and their combination. In particular, we train a classifier with virtual-world data, using such features and Real AdaBoost as learning machine. This classifier is applied to real-world training images. Then, a human oracle interactively corrects the wrong detections, i.e., few miss detections are manually annotated and some false ones are pointed out too. A low amount of manual annotation is fixed as restriction. Real- and virtual-world difficult samples are combined within what we call cool world and we retrain the classifier with this data. Our experiments show that this adapted classifier is equivalent to the one trained with only real-world data but requiring 90 annotations.

Keywords

Domain Adaptation IEEE Conf Integral Image Human Detection Pedestrian Detector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Vázquez
    • 1
  • Antonio M. López
    • 1
  • Daniel Ponsa
    • 1
  • David Gerónimo
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Vision Center (CVC) and the Computer Science Dept.Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)BarcelonaSpain

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