Cardiac Monitoring of Marathon Runners Using Disruption-Tolerant Wireless Sensors

  • Djamel Benferhat
  • Frédéric Guidec
  • Patrice Quinton
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7656)

Abstract

In most current biomedical monitoring applications, data acquired by sensors attached to a patient are either transmitted directly to a monitoring console for real-time processing, or they are simply recorded on the sensor unit for deferred analysis. In contrast collecting and transmitting biomedical data continuously over long distances in outdoor conditions is still a challenge. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using disruption-tolerant wireless sensors to monitor the cardiac activity of runners during a marathon race, using off-the-shelf sensing devices and a limited number of base stations deployed along the marathon route. Preliminary experiments conducted with a few volunteers running around a university campus confirm that this approach is viable, and suggest that it should scale up to a real marathon.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Djamel Benferhat
    • 1
    • 2
  • Frédéric Guidec
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrice Quinton
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.IRISAFrance
  2. 2.Université de Bretagne-SudFrance
  3. 3.ENS Cachan BretagneFrance

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