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A Computational Model for Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders by Hebbian Learning

  • Sebastien Naze
  • Jan Treur
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7664)

Abstract

This paper contributes a computational model for developing a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), based on insights from the neurological literature. A number of simulations are presented that show how under specific circumstances the model develops PTSD-phenomena such as re-experiencing, dissociation and flashback episodes.

Keywords

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Development Computational Model Hebbian Learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebastien Naze
    • 1
  • Jan Treur
    • 1
  1. 1.Agent Systems Research GroupVU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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