From LMS to PLE: A Step Forward through OpenSocial Apps in Moodle

  • Evgeny Bogdanov
  • Carsten Ullrich
  • Erik Isaksson
  • Matthias Palmer
  • Denis Gillet
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7558)

Abstract

Bringing flexibility and extensibility into Learning Management Systems) is crucial because it gives teachers and students a free choice of technologies and educational materials they want to use for their courses. The paper presents a solution via enabling widgets (OpenSocial apps) within Moodle. Our first Moodle plug-in allows teachers to freely choose a set of tools they want to use in their courses though students can not change widgets proposed by teachers. This environment was evaluated with students within several courses. Even though the environment was perceived as useful by students, they still lacked their own personalization. We describe how the future plug-in tackles this problem.

Keywords

widgets learning management systems personal learning environments flexible education 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evgeny Bogdanov
    • 1
  • Carsten Ullrich
    • 2
  • Erik Isaksson
    • 3
  • Matthias Palmer
    • 3
  • Denis Gillet
    • 1
  1. 1.Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Shanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Uppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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