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Brief Announcement: KARYON: Towards Safety Kernels for Cooperative Vehicular Systems

  • António Casimiro
  • Jörg Kaiser
  • Johan Karlsson
  • Elad Michael Schiller
  • Philippas Tsigas
  • Pedro Costa
  • José Parizi
  • Rolf Johansson
  • Renato Librino
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7596)

Abstract

KARYON, a kernel-based architecture for safety-critical control, is a European project that proposes a new perspective to improve performance of smart vehicle coordination focusing on Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADASs) and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The key objective is to provide system solutions for predictable and safe coordination of smart vehicles that autonomously cooperate and interact in an open and inherently uncertain environment. Currently, these systems are not allowed to operate on the public roads or in the air space, as the risk of causing severe damage cannot be excluded with sufficient certainty. The impact of the project is two-fold; it will provide improved vehicle density without driver involvement and increased traffic throughput to maintain mobility without a need to build new traffic infrastructures. The results will improve interaction in cooperation scenarios while preserving safety and assessing it according to standards. The prospective project results include self-stabilizing algorithms for vehicle coordination, communication and synchronization. In addition, we aim at showing that the safety kernel can be designed to be a self-stabilizing one.

Keywords

Controller Area Network Unman Aerial System Advance Driver Assistance System Cooperation Scenario Vehicle Coordination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • António Casimiro
    • 1
  • Jörg Kaiser
    • 2
  • Johan Karlsson
    • 3
  • Elad Michael Schiller
    • 3
  • Philippas Tsigas
    • 3
  • Pedro Costa
    • 4
  • José Parizi
    • 5
  • Rolf Johansson
    • 6
  • Renato Librino
    • 7
  1. 1.Univ. LisboaPortugal
  2. 2.Otto-von-Guericke Univ. MagdeburgGermany
  3. 3.Chalmers Univ. Tech.Sweden
  4. 4.GMVIS SKYSOFTPortugal
  5. 5.EMBRAER SABrazil
  6. 6.SP ABSweden
  7. 7.4S SRLItaly

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