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Which Words Do You Remember? Temporal Properties of Language Use in Digital Archives

  • Nina Tahmasebi
  • Gerhard Gossen
  • Thomas Risse
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7489)

Abstract

Knowing the behavior of terms in written texts can help us tailor fit models, algorithms and resources to improve access to digital libraries and help us answer information needs in longer spanning archives. In this paper we investigate the behavior of English written text in blogs in comparison to traditional texts from the New York Times, The Times Archive, and the British National Corpus. We show that user generated content, similar to spoken content, differs in characteristics from ‘professionally’ written text and experiences a more dynamic behavior.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nina Tahmasebi
    • 1
  • Gerhard Gossen
    • 1
  • Thomas Risse
    • 1
  1. 1.L3S Research CenterHannoverGermany

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