Ada and Grace: Direct Interaction with Museum Visitors

  • David Traum
  • Priti Aggarwal
  • Ron Artstein
  • Susan Foutz
  • Jillian Gerten
  • Athanasios Katsamanis
  • Anton Leuski
  • Dan Noren
  • William Swartout
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7502)

Abstract

We report on our efforts to prepare Ada and Grace, virtual guides in the Museum of Science, Boston, to interact directly with museum visitors, including children. We outline the challenges in extending the exhibit to support this usage, mostly relating to the processing of speech from a broad population, especially child speech. We also present the summative evaluation, showing success in all the intended impacts of the exhibit: that children ages 7–14 will increase their awareness of, engagement in, interest in, positive attitude about, and knowledge of computer science and technology.

Keywords

virtual human applications natural language interaction virtual museum guides STEM informal science education 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Traum
    • 1
  • Priti Aggarwal
    • 1
  • Ron Artstein
    • 1
  • Susan Foutz
    • 3
  • Jillian Gerten
    • 1
  • Athanasios Katsamanis
    • 2
  • Anton Leuski
    • 1
  • Dan Noren
    • 1
  • William Swartout
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Creative TechnologiesUSCLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Signal Analysis and Interpretation LaboratoryUSCLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Learning InnovationEdgewaterUSA

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