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An Evaluation of Open Source Physics Engines for Use in Virtual Reality Assembly Simulations

  • Johannes Hummel
  • Robin Wolff
  • Tobias Stein
  • Andreas Gerndt
  • Torsten Kuhlen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7432)

Abstract

We present a comparison of five freely available physics engines with specific focus on robotic assembly simulation in virtual reality (VR) environments. The aim was to evaluate the engines with generic settings and minimum parameter tweaking. Our benchmarks consider the minimum collision detection time for a large number of objects, restitution characteristics, as well as constraint reliability and body inter-penetration. A further benchmark tests the simulation of a screw and nut mechanism made of rigid-bodies only, without any analytic approximation. Our results show large deviations across the tested engines and reveal benefits and disadvantages that help in selecting the appropriate physics engine for assembly simulations in VR.

Keywords

Rigid Body Virtual Reality Collision Detection Physic Engine Rigid Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johannes Hummel
    • 1
  • Robin Wolff
    • 1
  • Tobias Stein
    • 2
  • Andreas Gerndt
    • 1
  • Torsten Kuhlen
    • 3
  1. 1.German Aerospace Center (DLR)Germany
  2. 2.Otto-von-Guericke UniversityGermany
  3. 3.Virtual Reality GroupRWTH Aachen UniversityGermany

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