Finale: Color in Foods, Photochemistry, Photoluminescence, Pharmaceuticals, Fireworks, Fun, and the Future

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

This final chapter will alliteratively pick up many topics that fell outside the trajectory traced by the history–chemistry—color interface in the previous seven chapters. We will see how colored additives affected the food quality of the past and, by extension, how color has affected, and continues to influence, so many other aspects of our daily lives.

Keywords

Malachite Green Silver Halide Colored Additive Lead Chromate Silver Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ChemistryThe College of New RochelleNew RochelleUSA

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