Introduction: Scope of the Book

Chapter
Part of the GeoPlanet: Earth and Planetary Sciences book series (GEPS)

Abstract

The occurrence of seismic events in glaciers has been an issue in the scientific literature since the 1950s. First targeted seismological studies were undertaken by the Polish Expedition to Spitsbergen in 1962. Most of research described in this book has been done by the author in the years 1970–2006 at three glaciers of various geographic regions: Hans Glacier in South Spitsbergen, Pasterze Glacier in the Alps and Huron Glacier in the Antarctic. Two categories of seismic events were distinguished by the author: the icequakes and icevibration-type events. This chapter is a brief outline of the scope of the book.

Keywords

Seismic Event Seismic Refraction Antarctic Region Ocean Bottom Seismometer Focal Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Faillettaz J, Sornette D, Funk M (2011) Icequakes coupled with surface displacements for predicting glacier break-off. J Glaciol 57(203):453–460CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Giżejewski J (ed) (2010) Bibliography of Polish research in Spitsbergen archipelago, Part II, 1997–2006. Publs Inst Geoph Pol Acad Sc M-31(407):149Google Scholar
  3. Górski M (1997) Seismicity of the Hornsund region, Spitsbergen: icequakes and earthquakes. Publs Inst Geoph Pol Acad Sc. B-20(308):77Google Scholar
  4. Grześ M, Sobota I (eds) (2005) Kaffioyra. Zarys środowiska geograficznego (Kaffioyra. Outline of Geographic Environment) Instytut Geografii UMK, Oficyna Wyd. Turpress (in Polish)Google Scholar
  5. Lewandowska H, Teisseyre R (1964) Investigations of ice microtremors on Spitsbergen in 1962. Biul Inf Komisji Wypraw Geof PAN 37:1–5Google Scholar
  6. MacAyeal DR, Okal EA, Aster RC, Bassis JN (2008) Seismic and hydroacoustic tremor generated by colliding icebergs. J Geophys Res 113:F03011. doi: 10.1029/2008JF001005 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Mikesell TD, vanWijk K, Haney MM, Bradford JH, Marshall HP, Harper JT (2012) Monitoring glacier surface seismicity in time and space using Rayleigh waves. J Geophys Res 117:F02020. doi: 10.1029/2011JF002259 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. O’Neel S, Larsen CF, Rupert N, Hansen R (2010) Iceberg calving as a primary source of regional-scale glacier-generated seismicity in the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska. J Geophys Res: Earth Surf 115, 115, F04034, doi: 10.1029/2009JF001598
  9. Rothlisberger H (1955) Studies on glacier physics on the Penny Ice Cap, Baffin Island, 1953, Part III: Seismic soundings. J Glaciol 18:539–552CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Teisseyre R (1996) Shear band thermodynamical earthquake model. Acta Geophys Pol 44:219–236Google Scholar
  11. Tsai VC, Rice JR, Fahnestock M (2008) Possible mechanisms for glacial earthquakes. J Geophys Res 113:F03014. doi: 10.1029/2007JF000944 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Veitch SA, Nettles M (2012) Spatial and temporal variations in Greenland glacial-earthquake activity, 1993–2010. J Geophys Res: Earth Surf 117:F04007. doi: 10.1029/2012JF002412 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Zalewski SM (ed) (2000) Bibliography of Polish research in Spitsbergen Archipelago, Part I, 1930–1996. Publs Inst Geophys Pol Acad Sc M-23(314):194Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of GeophysicsPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland

Personalised recommendations