Employment Location Models: Conclusions

Chapter
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

The development of the theories underlying applied employment location models for urban simulation models is far from linear. This book presents an overview of contemporary studies, including continuing refinements to existing model packages, and new developments. We discuss the main drivers behind employment location, a generalization of approaches and relevant issues for the future development of these models.

Keywords

Firm Location Micro Model Employment Location Microsimulation Model Microscopic Simulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.David Simmonds Consultancy Ltd.CambridgeUK
  2. 2.Heriot-Watt UniversityEdinburghScotland
  3. 3.SignificanceThe Hague, Zuid-HollandNetherlands

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