Article 22 [Identification of EU Interests and Objectives in the External Action Area: Competent Authorities and Instruments]

  • Hermann-Josef Blanke
  • Stelio Mangiameli
Chapter

Abstract

Art. 22 TEU constitutes a complementary provision to Art. 21 TEU. The core theme underlying both articles is the issue of coherence and consistency. Both articles may be understood as reactions to the traditional state with its fragmentation of competences and organisational structures, which had been a logical consequence of the pillarisation of the EU since Maastricht. The segmentation into the classical community pillar and the new, second pillar of CFSP had led to strong institutional rivalries and a clear lack of consistency between Community policies of an external character and intergovernmental CFSP.

Keywords

Foreign Policy External Action Security Policy Common Strategy European Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Amato, G., Bribosia, H., & de Witte, B. (Eds.). (2007). Genèse et destine de la Constitution Europé-enne. Commentaire du Traité établissant une Constitution pour l’Europe à la lumière des travaux préparatoires et perspectives d’avenir. Brussels: Bruylant.Google Scholar
  2. Blázquez Peinado, M. D. (2008). Algunas consideraciones en torno a la regulación del Consejo, el Consejo Europeo y la Comisión en el Tratado de Lisboa. Revista de Derecho Constitucional Europeo, 29, 165–192.Google Scholar
  3. Bulmer, S., & Wessels, W. (1987). The European Council – Decision-making in European Politics. Basingstoke: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  4. Calliess, C., & Ruffert, M. (Eds.). (2006). Verfassung der Europäischen Union. Kommentar der Grundlagenbestimmungen. Munich & Vienna: C.H. Beck & Manz.Google Scholar
  5. Calliess, C., & Ruffert, M. (Eds.). (2011). EUV/AEUV-Kommentar (4th ed.). Munich: C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  6. Carchidi, C. R. (2007). Il Consiglio Europeo: evoluzione, competenze e prassi. Milano: Giuffré.Google Scholar
  7. Craig, P., & de Búrca, G. (2008). EU law: Text, cases, and materials (4th ed.). Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
  8. Cremona, M. (2008a). Defining competence in EU external relations: Lessons from the Treaty reform process. In A. Dashwood & M. Maresceau (Eds.), Law and practice of EU external relations: Salient features of a changing landscape (pp. 54–69). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Cremona, M. (2008b). Defending the community interest. The duties of cooperation and compliance. In M. Cremona & B. de Witte (Eds.), EU foreign relations law: Constitutional fundamentals (pp. 125–170). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  10. Cremona, M. (2011). Coherence in European Union Foreign Relations Law. In P. Koutrakos (Ed.), European Foreign Policy: Legal and political perspectives (pp. 55–92). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.Google Scholar
  11. Dann, P. (2009). Political institutions. In A. von Bogdandy & J. Bast (Eds.), Principles of European constitutional law (2nd ed., pp. 237–273). Oxford: Hart Publishing & C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  12. Dashwood, A. (2008a). Article 47 TEU and the relationship between first and second pillar competences. In A. Dashwood & M. Maresceau (Eds.), Law and practice of EU external relations: Salient features of a changing landscape (pp. 70–103 et seqq). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Dashwood, A. (2008b). The law and practice of CFSP joint actions. In M. Cremona & B. de Witte (Eds.), EU foreign relations law: Constitutional fundamentals (pp. 53–77). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  14. De Baere, G. (2008). Constitutional principles of EU external relations. Oxford: OUP.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. De Schoutheete, P. (2006). The European Council. In J. Peterson & M. Shackleton (Eds.), The Institutions of the European Union (2nd ed., pp. 37–59). Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
  16. Dijkstra, H. (2009). Commission versus Council Secretariat: An analysis of Bureaucratic Rivalry in European Foreign Policy. European Foreign Affairs Review, 14(4), 431–450.Google Scholar
  17. Duke, S. (2011). Consistency, coherence and European external action: The path to Lisbon and beyond. In P. Koutrakos (Ed.), European Foreign Policy: Legal and political perspectives (pp. 15–54). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.Google Scholar
  18. Dunne, T. (1995). The Social Construction of International Society. European Journal of International Law, 1(3), 367–389.Google Scholar
  19. Eeckhout, P. (2005). External relations of the European Union: Legal and constitutional foundations. Oxford: OUP.Google Scholar
  20. van Elsuwege, P. (2010). EU external action after the collapse of the pillar structure: In search of a new balance between delimitation and consistency. Common Market Law Review, 47(4), 987–1019.Google Scholar
  21. Frenz, W. (2010). Die neue GASP. Zeitschrift für ausländisches öffentliches Recht und Völkerrecht, 70(3), 487–521.Google Scholar
  22. Gauttier, P. (2004). Horizontal coherence and the external competences of the European Union. European Law Journal, 10(1), 23–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Grabitz, E., Hilf, M., & Nettesheim, M. (2011). Das Recht der Europäischen Union. Kommentar zum Vertrag von Lissabon. Loose leaf. Munich: C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  24. Hillion, C., & Wessel, R. A. (2008). Restraining external competences of EU Member States under CFSP. In M. Cremona & B. de Witte (Eds.), EU foreign relations law: Constitutional fundamentals (pp. 79–121). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  25. Juncos, A., & Reynolds, C. (2007). The Political and Security Committee: Governing in the shadow. European Foreign Affairs Review, 12(2), 127–147.Google Scholar
  26. Koutrakos, P. (2006). EU international relations Law. Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  27. Koutrakos, P. (2008). Legal basis and delimitation of competence in EU external relations. In M. Cremona & B. de Witte (Eds.), EU foreign relations law: Constitutional fundamentals (pp. 171–198). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  28. Missiroli, A. (2010). The new EU ‘Foreign Policy’ system after Lisbon: A work in progress. European Foreign Affairs Review, 15(4), 427–452.Google Scholar
  29. Morillas, P. (2011). Institutionalization or intergovernmental decision-taking in Foreign Policy: The implementation of the Lisbon treaty. European Foreign Affairs Review, 16(2), 243–257.Google Scholar
  30. Oppermann, T., Classen, C. D., & Nettesheim, M. (2009). Europarecht (4th ed.). Munich: C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  31. Pernice, I. (2003). Il Consiglio europeo e il presidente del’Unione europea: quale leadership democratica in Europa? Diritto e cultura, 13(1–2), 161–183.Google Scholar
  32. Piris, J.-C. (2010). The Lisbon treaty. A legal and political analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Schwarze, J. (Ed.). (2009). EU-Kommentar (2nd ed.). Baden-Baden: Nomos.Google Scholar
  34. Thym, D. (2008). Parliamentary involvement in European international relations. In M. Cremona & B. de Witte (Eds.), EU foreign relations law: Constitutional fundamentals (pp. 201–232). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  35. Thym, D. (2009). Foreign affairs. In A. von Bogdandy & J. Bast (Eds.), Principles of European constitutional law (2nd ed., pp. 309–343). Oxford: Hart Publishing & C.H. Beck.Google Scholar
  36. Vanhoonacker, S., & Reslow, N. (2010). The European external action service: Living forwards by understanding backwards. European Foreign Affairs Review, 15(1), 1–18.Google Scholar
  37. Youngs, R. (2004). Normative dynamics and strategic interests in the EU’s external identity. Journal of Common Market Studies, 42(2), 415–435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hermann-Josef Blanke
    • 1
  • Stelio Mangiameli
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty for Economics, Law and Social ScienceUniversity of ErfurtErfurtGermany
  2. 2.National Research Council Institute for Regionalism, Federalism and Self-GovernmentRomeItaly

Personalised recommendations