Seismic Design of Piles in Liquefiable Soils

Chapter
Part of the Springer Geology book series (SPRINGERGEOL, volume 9)

Abstract

Lands around the coasts are often reclaimed, contain fill materials/loose fills and therefore potentially liquefiable under moderate to strong shaking. Collapse and/or severe damage to pile-supported structures are still observed in liquefiable soils after most major earthquakes e.g. the 2011 Japan earthquake, 2010 Chile earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, the 2004 Sumatra earthquake, the 2001 Bhuj earthquake, the 1995 Kobe earthquake. Poor performance of pile foundations remains a great concern to the earthquake engineering community. A comprehensive overview of pile damages observed in the recent earthquakes is presented in this paper. This paper also critically reviews all the established pile failure theories. Deficiencies of the existing pile failure theories are highlighted. Various analyses procedures for piles in liquefiable soils are discussed.

Keywords

Pile failure Liquefaction Earthquake 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the funding received from National Science Foundation (China) and Royal Society (U.K). This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China through the Grant No 41111130205.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of BristolBristolU.K
  2. 2.Tongji UniversityShanghaiChina

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