Creating Value Through Open Innovation in Social E-Learning

  • Per Andersson
  • Pierre Jarméus
  • Simone Masog
  • Christopher Rosenqvist
  • Carl Sundberg
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses how to create value in the network, which is critical since social media-based E-learning can be seen as a network of actors interacting with each other. The more value a network can potentially accrue, the richer the learning experience is for the participants. Value in this instance is defined as the network’s ability to generate and aid the construction of social knowledge. Further, the chapter discusses the implementation of social media-based E-learning and finally some practical advice is presented about how to implement social media-based E-learning.

Keywords

Social Medium Open Innovation Behavioural Process Acceptance Process Practical Advice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Further Reading

  1. Bradley, A., & Mcdonald, M. (2011). The social organization. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press.Google Scholar
  2. Koulouvari P. (2001) Organizational learning in dynamic environments: case studies from the media industry, Ph.D. thesis. KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden http://kth.diva----portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:8870
  3. Rosenberg, M. (2001). E-Learning: strategies for delivering knowledge in the digital age. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  4. Rosenberg, M., & Chichester, J. (2006). Beyond e-learning: approaches and technologies to enhance organizational knowledge, learning, and performance. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Andersson
    • 1
  • Pierre Jarméus
    • 2
  • Simone Masog
    • 1
  • Christopher Rosenqvist
    • 1
  • Carl Sundberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marketing & StrategyStockholm School of EconomicsStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Accenture AB, SOLNAStockholmSweden

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