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One Way of Bringing Final Year Computer Science Student World to the World of Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Case Study

  • Isabel M. Gómez
  • Rafael Cabrera
  • Juan Ojeda
  • Pablo García
  • Alberto J. Molina
  • Octavio Rivera
  • A. Mariano Esteban
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7382)

Abstract

In this paper, a learning project is explained which is being carried out at the school of computer science at the University of Seville. The aim is that students receive knowledge of assistive technologies when in fact there is no this discipline in our curricula. So the best way, it is programming final studies projects in this field. We want to make the projects have a real application and can solve difficulties that children with Cerebral Palsy have in their daily activities in the school.

Keywords

serious games trainig in assistive technologies access device 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabel M. Gómez
    • 1
  • Rafael Cabrera
    • 1
  • Juan Ojeda
    • 1
  • Pablo García
    • 1
  • Alberto J. Molina
    • 1
  • Octavio Rivera
    • 1
  • A. Mariano Esteban
    • 2
  1. 1.Electronic Technology DepartmentUniversidad de SevillaSpain
  2. 2.GuadaltelS.A. SevilleSpain

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