The Gulf War of 1991: Its Environmental Impact

Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice book series (BRIEFSPIONEER, volume 1)

Abstract

The Gulf War of 1991 shares with the Second Indochina War of 1961–1975 (cf. Chap.4 ) the dubious honor of having alerted the world to the enormously destructive impact military actions can have on the environment. Certainly, various wars of the past have also wreaked havoc on the environment (#108, pp 14–19), and wars of the future will doubtless provide further examples.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Security & EducationWesting Associates in EnvironmentPutneyUSA

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