A Design Pattern Library for Mutual Understanding and Cooperation in Serious Game Design

  • Bertrand Marne
  • John Wisdom
  • Benjamin Huynh-Kim-Bang
  • Jean-Marc Labat
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7315)

Abstract

With serious games (SG) design it is difficult to offset fun and learning, especially when commercial partners, with different goals and methods, are involved. To produce an effective combination of fun and learning, we present our Design Pattern Library to address this issue. This library is aimed to help teachers fully take part in serious game design and to encourage mutual understanding between the different stakeholders enhancing cooperation.

Keywords

serious games methodology design patterns game design instructional design cooperation pedagogy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bertrand Marne
    • 1
  • John Wisdom
    • 2
  • Benjamin Huynh-Kim-Bang
    • 1
  • Jean-Marc Labat
    • 1
  1. 1.LIP6University Pierre et Marie CurieParisFrance
  2. 2.L’UTESUniversity Pierre et Marie CurieParisFrance

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