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The Politics of Military Reform in Indonesia and Nigeria

Chapter
Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

The end of the Cold War seemed to dramatically enhance the opportunities for the global expansion of democracy. By the early 1990s, many former allies of the Soviet Union had embarked on fundamental political and economic reforms and Western countries had ended their support of authoritarian regimes in the name of anti-communism. At the same time, Western governments had initiated democracy promotion programs, as did international organizations and transnational civil society advocacy networks (Carothers, 1999; Jetschke, 2010; Schraeder, 2002).

Keywords

Civil Society Armed Force Democratic Transition Military Officer Military Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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