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The Dilemmas of China’s Political Science in the Context of the Rise of China

Chapter

Abstract

Over the course of just a few decades, China has progressed from being a relatively marginal member of the international community to a key participant in addressing economic, political and security issues at both the regional and global levels. The pace and nature of China’s ongoing ascendancy are generating serious policy concerns like the anxiety of the United States about China as a potential rival (Ikenberry 2008). The rise of China has changed the international balance of power, which could have a significant impact on the validating process of political science.

Keywords

Social Science Natural Science Academic Freedom Chinese Scholar Moral Science 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and EducationDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia

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