Natural Hazards of the Arabian Peninsula: Their Causes and Possible Remediation

Chapter
Part of the Society of Earth Scientists Series book series (SESS)

Abstract

Natural hazards of both geological and atmospheric origin that have impacted the Arabian Peninsula during past are reviewed. The geological hazards discussed in this paper include earthquakes, tsunamis and tidal waves, and volcanism. Likewise, atmospheric hazards include tropical cyclones and storm surges, and sand and dust storms. A third category is of natural hazard is discussed in which severity of negative impact of natural hazard on human population and environment has a component of anthropogenic activities also. The hazards covered in this category are droughts and desertification, and flash floods. All these natural hazards are described in terms of their origin, location and time of their occurrence around the Arabian Peninsula, extent of damage to property and loss of life. It is emphasized that there is a need for a comprehensive regional disaster management and prevention policy from all the countries of the Arabian Peninsula to tackle effectively the disastrous consequences and minimize their impact on society and environment. Most oil rich countries of this region score very low on Environmental Sustainable Index (ESI) because of their economic and developmental policies. They implicitly subsidize or support a wasteful and environmentally destructive use of resources. The fast pace of economic and infrastructure development that has been going on in the region for the past several decades has adversely impacted the regions’ environment and habitat of local flora and fauna. All future development plans must consider environmental consequences and follow prudent disaster management and prevention policies for effective mitigation of imminent natural hazard that most likely will strike this region.

Keywords

Tropical Cyclone Saudi Arabia Dust Storm United Arab Emirate Arabian Peninsula 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I thank King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia for permission to publish this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Petroleum and Minerals, Research InstituteKing Fahd University of Petroleum and MineralsDhahranSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Department of Earth Science, Ottawa-Carleton Geoscience CentreCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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