Advertisement

Programming of Hypermedia

Course Implementation in Social Media
  • Kirsi SiliusEmail author
  • Anne-Maritta Tervakari
  • Jukka Huhtamäki
  • Teemo Tebest
  • Jarno Marttila
  • Meri Kailanto
  • Thumas Miilumäki
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 144)

Abstract

In order to promote students’ peer learning skills and to motivate them to learn, the Hypermedia Laboratory at the Tampere University of Technology (TUT) organised a course entitled Programming of Hypermedia, which attempts to solve authentic, real-world problems. TUT Circle, a socialmedia web service, was used as the web-based learning environment for the course. It has most of the basic functions that are common in modern social media andWeb 2.0 services. The research focused in finding out, first, if the teaching experiment with TUT Circle was pedagogically usable and, second, if students voluntarily utilised peer learning to learn with and from each other without immediate teacher intervention. Both a survey and network analysis of the log data support the fact that TUT Circle supported peer learning and does not have major defects from a pedagogical usability viewpoint.

Keywords

Teaching Experiment Social Network Analysis Authentic Learning Teacher Intervention Exercise Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Carroll, J.M., Rosson, M.B.: Toward even more authentic case-based learning. Educational Technology 45, 5–11 (2005)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brown, J.S., Collins, A., Dugui, P.: Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Educational Researcher 18(1), 32–42 (1989)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lave, J., Wenger, E.: Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1991)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Donovan, M.S., Bransford, J.D., Pellegrino, J.W.: How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice. National Academy Press, Washington, DC (1999)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Boud, D., Cohen, R., Sampson, J.: Peer learning and assessment. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 24(4), 413–426 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Silius, K., Miilumäki, T., Huhtamäki, J., Tebest, T., Meriläinen, J., Pohjolainen, S.: Students’ motivations for social media enhanced studying and learning. Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal, the special issue on “Technology Enhanced Learning” 2(1) (2010)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Silius, K., Tervakari, A.M.: An evaluation of the usefulness of web-based learning environments: The evaluation tool into the portal of Finnish Virtual University. In: Pearrocha, V., et al. (eds.) Proceedings of mENU 2003—Int. Conf. University Networks and E-learning, Valencia, Spain, May 8-9, 2003, pp. 8–9 (2003)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Freeman, L.C.: Methods of social network visualization. In: Meyers, R.A. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science. Springer, Berlin (2009)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kirsi Silius
    • 1
    Email author
  • Anne-Maritta Tervakari
    • 1
  • Jukka Huhtamäki
    • 1
  • Teemo Tebest
    • 1
  • Jarno Marttila
    • 1
  • Meri Kailanto
    • 1
  • Thumas Miilumäki
    • 1
  1. 1.Tampere University of TechnologyTampereFinland

Personalised recommendations