Autonomic Dysfunction

Chapter

Abstract

Autonomic dysfunction is defined by dystonia (paroxystic increase in muscle tone) and at least one of the below following symptoms:

Keywords

Excessive Weight Loss Autonomic Dysfunction Club Foot Nitrogen Loss Functional Independence Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryOdense University HospitalOdenseDK

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