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Development, Sustainability and International Politics

  • Jamel Napolitano
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter argues for a lecture of the notion of development as strongly linked to the uneven distribution of material and non-material sources of power among groups. It thus analyses the rise of a public environmentalist awareness in the late twentieth century as a challenge to the capitalist pattern of production and consumption. Finally, the chapter aims to shed some light on the process of mainstreaming these claims by subsuming them within the western model of societal transformation, under the new, catchy label of sustainable development.

Pressing for institutional solutions to environmental depletion has meant to further spread the sustainability goal worldwide. On the other hand, it has also implied a kind of betrayal of the truly transformative instances of many social movements and local communities, which were seeking for a revolutionary, rather than reformative, path to societal change.

Keywords

Global Governance World Culture Wicked Problem Soft Power Issue Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Apart from the whole project team, I would like to mention the friendly, challenging and suggestive help I received from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies staff and, in particular, from Prof. Klaus Töpfer, Judith Enders, Alexander Perez Carmona and Moritz Remig. This chapter, indeed, has been mostly written during an exciting research experience at the IASS, which has represented a stimulating working environment to carry out the TransGov Project. I would also like to thank Dr. Philipp Lepenies, who made many highly valuable comments on the chapter, as well as the scholars who have had a considerable role in my academic training, Prof. Filippo Andreatta and Prof. Mauro Di Meglio. Moreover, I am grateful to Giulio, Diana, Martha, Camilla; to Filippo; and finally to Viola, born while I was approaching the conclusive steps of my inquiry. This chapter is definitely dedicated to her. Obviously, I remain the only one to blame for all inaccuracies and errors.

Open Access. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

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Open Access. This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fondazione Istituto Carlo CattaneoBolognaItaly

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