Integrating Intelligent Robot Services in Holonic Manufacturing

  • Florin Daniel Anton
  • Theodor Borangiu
  • Silvia Anton
  • Marco Ceccarelli
  • Giuseppe Carbone
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 402)

Abstract

In the holonic manufacturing framework, production systems must process the orders, starting from the basic order submitted by the client, which gives the information only about the type of the products and the quantity (and maybe the delivery date). In order to obtain the final product(s) which has been ordered, the production system must decompose each order into a set of operations based on the capability of the production system. Each entity (in this case robots) can execute a set of operations – offer a service (object assembly, part inspection, etc.), based on its attributes (execution speed, working envelope, dexterity, etc.) and resources (tools magazine, raw materials, components for assembly, vision system, network connectivity, etc.) The chapter presents a case study for intelligent robot services in holonic manufacturing and is focused on how to create an automated system which is capable to decompose the initial order in sets of operations based on the services which the robots can offer, transform the operations into robot programs and offer high availability services.

Keywords

robot services holonic production high availability fault tolerance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florin Daniel Anton
    • 1
  • Theodor Borangiu
    • 1
  • Silvia Anton
    • 1
  • Marco Ceccarelli
    • 2
  • Giuseppe Carbone
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Automation and Industrial InformaticsUniversity Politehnica of BucharestBucharestRomania
  2. 2.Laboratory of Robotics and MechatronicsUniversity of CassinoCassinoItaly

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