The User-Subjective Approach to Personal Information Management: From Theory to Practice

  • Ofer Bergman

Abstract

PIM systems are unique in that the person who stores the information and decides on its organization is the same person who later retrieves it. The user-subjective approach takes advantage of this unique feature and suggests that PIM systems should make systematic use of subjective, user-dependent attributes. This chapter presents the development of the approach from theory through empirical evidence to practical design schemes: (a) It describes its three theoretical design principles - the subjective project classification principle, the subjective importance principle and the subjective context principle; (b) provides evidence to support them - users use subjective attributes when these are sporadically encouraged by design, and at times even when they are discouraged, by using their own alternative ways of doing so; and (c) presents six intriguely simple design schemes that derive from these principles. In addition, the chapter describes three alternative approaches to PIM system design (search, multiple-classification and automatic classification) and reports on a set of ongoing studies to assess them.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ofer Bergman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information ScienceBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael

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