Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of Shock Oscillations in Hypersonic Vehicle’s Flowpath

  • Guo Shanguang
  • Liu Jun
  • Huang Wei
  • Jin Liang
  • Luo Shibin
Conference paper

Introduction

Scramjet is a new type of airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems. Unlike the turbojets that use a turbine to compress air for combustion, the scramjet contains virtually no moving parts, and relies on supersonic forward motion instead for air compression. The advantages a scramjet offer over a rocket engine is that a scramjet draws its oxygen from earth’s atmosphere, unlike a rocket that must carry its oxygen supply. Such, the scramjet craft can be made smaller, lighter and faster, providing much greater range for the same fuel load [1]. So, scramjet becomes preferred engine for hypersonic vehicles [2]. A scramjet normally operates above Mach 4. To get a aircraft to Mach 4, a jet or rocket engine is typically used for the initial acceleration. During boost phase, the inlet is open, and the nozzle is closed, so the flowpath of the hypersonic vehicle forms a blind cavity. Then shock wave oscillations may be appear [3], and this brings serious challenges for structure and flight control design of the vehicle.

Keywords

Shock Wave Compression Wave AIAA Paper Rocket Engine Survey Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guo Shanguang
    • 1
  • Liu Jun
    • 1
  • Huang Wei
    • 1
  • Jin Liang
    • 1
  • Luo Shibin
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Aerospace and Material EngineeringNational University of Defense TechnologyChangshaChina

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