Safety Aspects for a Pre-clinical Magnetic Particle Imaging Scanner

  • Gael Bringout
  • Hanne Wojtczyk
  • Mandy Grüttner
  • Matthias Graeser
  • Wiebke Tenner
  • Julian Hägele
  • Florian M. Vogt
  • Jörg Barkhausen
  • Thorsten M. Buzug
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 140)

Abstract

Magnetic Particle Imaging is a promising new imaging technique using magnetic fields to image magnetic tracer material in the body. As with MRI systems, time varying magnetic fields raise some safety issues. The stimulation of peripheral nerves and tissues is one of them. In the paper, the stimulation thresholds are explained and an evaluation of the stimulation generated by a pre-clinical scanner is calculated. It appears clearly that, even if driving fields of high amplitude are used, cardiac arrhythmias are unlikely to be induced. However, it is yet unclear whether some peripheral nerve stimulation may be induced.

Keywords

Safety Aspect Specific Absorption Rate Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Stimulation Threshold Cardiac Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gael Bringout
    • 1
  • Hanne Wojtczyk
    • 1
  • Mandy Grüttner
    • 1
  • Matthias Graeser
    • 1
  • Wiebke Tenner
    • 1
  • Julian Hägele
    • 2
  • Florian M. Vogt
    • 2
  • Jörg Barkhausen
    • 2
  • Thorsten M. Buzug
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Medical EngineeringUniversity of LübeckLübeckGermany
  2. 2.Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear MedicineUniversity Hospital Schleswig-HolsteinLübeckGermany

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