Precision Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Use as Contrast Agents

  • Jan Niehaus
  • Sören Becker
  • Christian Schmidtke
  • Katja Werner
  • Horst Weller
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 140)

Abstract

The use of magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents in biomedical applications requires highly reproducible markers soluble in aqueous media. Here we present a modular approach for the formation of a magnetic contrast agent, which is composed of an inorganic core like iron oxide and a water solubility mediating polymer shell. The shell can also be a carrier for specific affinity molecules like antibodies or peptides, which offer the possibility to selectively target surface receptors upon cells.

Keywords

Iron Oxide Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Iron Oxide Particle Anionic Polymerization Inorganic Core 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Niehaus
    • 1
  • Sören Becker
    • 2
  • Christian Schmidtke
    • 2
  • Katja Werner
    • 1
  • Horst Weller
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Applied Nanotechnology GmbHUniversity HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Physical ChemistryUniversity HamburgHamburgGermany

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