Identification of conductible fractures at the upper- and mid- stream of the Jhuoshuei River Watershed (Taiwan)

  • P.Y. Chou
  • H.C. Lo
  • C.T. Wang
  • C.H. Chao
  • S.M. Hsu
  • Y.T. Lin
  • C.C. Huang
Part of the Environmental Earth Sciences book series (EESCI)

Abstract

The movement and storage of ground water in the mountainous region has a significant impact on the dynamics of surface water flow. An adequate identification of the conductible fracture in the aquifer has thus received growing interest over the past decades. This paper summarizes the major findings from the first year of a hydrogeological investigation program initiated by the Central Geological Survey, Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) of Taiwan since 2010, with a special focus on exploring in detail the fracture permeability. During the on-site investigation, geophysical logging was applied to delineate the lithostratigraphic characteristics of bedrock aquifers. The hydraulic conductivity of 67 observation segments was estimated by the constant head injection method. From the information gathered in this study, the hydraulic conductivities of the identified fractured medium above a depth of 40m are more than one order higher than that of the matrix. The occurrence of ground water in a fracture network, however, is found to be not solely governed by lithological composition, but more possibly by fracture porosity and spacing. A simple linear relationship was found by plotting the hydraulic conductivity against the product of total porosity and cubic aperture ratio (fracture spacing/sealed-off interval between the packers).

Keywords

Hydraulic Conductivity Total Porosity Fracture Network Fracture Permeability Fracture Porosity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • P.Y. Chou
    • 1
  • H.C. Lo
    • 1
  • C.T. Wang
    • 1
  • C.H. Chao
    • 1
  • S.M. Hsu
    • 1
  • Y.T. Lin
    • 1
  • C.C. Huang
    • 1
  1. 1.Sinotech Engineering Consultants, Inc., No. 7Geotechnical Engineering Research CenterTaipeiTaiwan, Province of China

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