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Catalog of Basic Scenes for Rare/Incongruent Event Detection

  • Danilo Hollosi
  • Stefan Wabnik
  • Stephan Gerlach
  • Steffen Kortlang
Part of the Studies in Computational Intelligence book series (SCI, volume 384)

Abstract

A catalog of basic audio-visual recordings containing rare and incongruent events for security and in-home-care scenarios for European research project Detection and Identification of Rare Audio-visual Cues is presented in this paper. The purpose of this catalog is to provide a basic and atomistic testbed to the scientific community in order to validate methods for rare and incongruent event detection. The recording equipment and setup is defined to minimize the influence of error that might affect the overall quality of the recordings in a negative way. Additional metadata, such as a defined format for scene descriptions, comments, labels and physical parameters of the recording setup is presented as a basis for evaluation of the utilized multimodal detectors, classifiers and combined methods for rare and incongruent event detection. The recordings presented in this work are available online on the DIRAC preoject website [1].

Keywords

Event Detection Voice Activity Detection Cast Shadow Recording Setup Video Frame Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    IST-027787 project website: Detection and Identification of Rare Audio-visual Cues - DIRAC, http://www.diracproject.org/
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danilo Hollosi
    • 1
  • Stefan Wabnik
    • 1
  • Stephan Gerlach
    • 2
  • Steffen Kortlang
    • 2
  1. 1.Project Group Hearing Speech and Audio TechnologyFraunhofer Institute for Digital Media TechnologyOldenburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute of PhysicsCarl von Ossietzky University of OldenburgOldenburgGermany

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