Modeling Nonverbal Behavior of a Virtual Counselor during Intimate Self-disclosure

  • Sin-Hwa Kang
  • Candy Sidner
  • Jonathan Gratch
  • Ron Artstein
  • Lixing Huang
  • Louis-Philippe Morency
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6895)

Abstract

Humans often share personal information with others in order to create social connections. Sharing personal information is especially important in counseling interactions [2]. Research studying the relationship between intimate self-disclosure and human behavior critically informs the development of virtual agents that create rapport with human interaction partners. One significant example of this application is using virtual agents as counselors in psychotherapeutic situations. The capability of expressing different intimacy levels is key to a successful virtual counselor to reciprocally induce disclosure in clients. Nonverbal behavior is considered critical for indicating intimacy [1] and is important when designing a social virtual agent such as a counselor. One key research question is how to properly express intimate self-disclosure. In this study, our main goal is to find what types of interviewees’ nonverbal behavior is associated with different intimacy levels of verbal self-disclosure. Thus, we investigated humans’ nonverbal behavior associated to self-disclosure during interview setting (with intimate topics).

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References

  1. 1.
    Edinger, J., Patterson, M.: Nonverbal Involvement and Social Control. Psychological Bulletin 93(1), 30–56 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Farber, B.: Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy. Guilford, New York (2006)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kang, S., Gratch, J.: Virtual Humans Elicit Socially Anxious Interactants’ Verbal Self-Disclosure. Journal of Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds 21(3-4), 473–482 (2010)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sin-Hwa Kang
    • 1
  • Candy Sidner
    • 2
  • Jonathan Gratch
    • 1
  • Ron Artstein
    • 1
  • Lixing Huang
    • 1
  • Louis-Philippe Morency
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Creative TechnologiesUniversity of Southern CaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.Dept of Computer ScienceWorcester Polytechnic InstituteUSA

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