Using Planning to Train Crisis Decision Makers

  • Amedeo Cesta
  • Gabriella Cortellessa
  • Riccardo De Benedictis
  • Keith Strickland
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6934)

Abstract

Training for crisis decision makers poses a number of challenges that range from the necessity to foster creative decision making to the need of creating engaging and realistic scenarios in support of experiential learning. This article describes our effort to build an end-to-end intelligent system, called the Pandora-Box, that supports a trainer in populating a 4-5 hours training session with exercises for a class of decision makers to teach them how to achieve joint decisions under stress. The paper gives a comprehensive view of the current system and in particular focuses on how AI planning technology has been customized to serve this purpose. Aspects considered are: (a) the timeline-based representation that acts as the core component for creating training sessions and unifying different concepts of the Pandora domain; (b) the combination of planning and execution functionalities to maintain and dynamically adapt a “lesson plan” on the basis of both trainees-trainer interactions and individual behavioral features and performance; (c) the importance of keeping the trainer in the loop preserving his/her responsibility in creating content for the class but endowing him/her with a set of new functionalities.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Wilkins, D., Smith, S.F., Kramer, L., Lee, T., Rauenbusch, T.: Airlift Mission Monitoring and Dynamic Rescheduling. Eng. Appl. of AI 21(2), 141–155 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jourdan, M., Layaida, N., Roisin, C.: A Survey on Authoring Techniques for Temporal Scenarios of Multimedia Documents. In: Furht, B. (ed.) Handbook of Internet and Multimedia Systems and Applications - Part 1: Tools and Standards, pp. 469–490. CRC Press, Boca Raton (1998)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Young, R.M.: Notes on the Use of Plan Structures in the Creation of Interactive Plot. In: Working Notes of the AAAI Fall Symposium on “Narrative Intelligence”, Cape Cod, MA (1999)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Muscettola, N.: HSTS: Integrating Planning and Scheduling. In: Zweben, M., Fox, M.S. (eds.) Intelligent Scheduling. Morgan Kaufmann, San Francisco (1994)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cortellessa, G., D’Amico, R., Pagani, M., Tiberio, L., De Benedictis, R., Bernardi, G., Cesta, A.: Modeling Users of Crisis Training Environments by Integrating Psychological and Physiological Data. In: Mehrotra, K.G., Mohan, C.K., Oh, J.C., Varshney, P.K., Ali, M. (eds.) IEA/AIE 2011, Part II. LNCS (LNAI), vol. 6704, pp. 79–88. Springer, Heidelberg (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bandura, A.: Social Foundations of Thought and Actions. A Social Cognitive Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs (1986)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amedeo Cesta
    • 1
  • Gabriella Cortellessa
    • 1
  • Riccardo De Benedictis
    • 1
  • Keith Strickland
    • 2
  1. 1.CNR, Italian National Research CouncilISTCRomeItaly
  2. 2.Cabinet OfficeEmergency Planning CollegeYorkUK

Personalised recommendations