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Vicon Motion Capture and HD 1080 Standard Video Data Fusion Based on Minimized Markers Reprojection Error

  • Karol Jędrasiak
  • Łukasz Janik
  • Andrzej Polański
  • Konrad Wojciechowski
Part of the Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 102)

Summary

We present an algorithm for quantity motion capture and multi camera HD 1080 standard reference video data fusion. It consists of initial calibration step which is based on some set of selected frames and final fusion for the rest of frames. Implemented data fusion algorithm can be used in case that it is possible to find a time interval when both devices were recording the same sequence of poses. It is worth to emphasise there are no special calibration patterns used during calibration. Advantage of the algorithm is that the required calibration step can be perfomed simultaneously with actor calibration from Vicon Blade system. It is also allowed that cameras locations can be changed during acquisition process as long as they observe known motion capture markers. After calibration and synchronization reprojection is possible in real time for VGA resolution or in reduced frequency for HD 1080 standard. Performed experiments determined that average projection error is about 1.45 pixel in the Full-HD 1920×1080 reference video and it is perceptualy acceptable. Practical usage for training video depersonification was presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karol Jędrasiak
    • 1
  • Łukasz Janik
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrzej Polański
    • 1
    • 2
  • Konrad Wojciechowski
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Polish-Japanese Institute of Information TechnologyBytomPoland
  2. 2.Silesian University of TechnologyGliwicePoland

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