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4MALITY: Coaching Students with Different Problem-Solving Strategies Using an Online Tutoring System

  • Leena Razzaq
  • Robert W. Maloy
  • Sharon Edwards
  • David Marshall
  • Ivon Arroyo
  • Beverly P. Woolf
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6787)

Abstract

4-coach Mathematics Active Learning Intelligent Tutoring sYstem (4MALITY) is a web-based intelligent tutoring system for 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students who are learning math content from the state of Massachusetts (USA) required curriculum framework. The goal of 4MALITY is to personalize help for students by offering them problem-solving strategies authored from multiple points of view. Four virtual coaches (Estella Explainer, Chef Math Bear, How-to Hound, and Visual Vicuna) are designed to capture the character and content of these different problem-solving approaches with language, computation, strategy, and visual hints. A preliminary study was run with 102 students in fourth and fifth grade math classrooms over a period of two months. The results showed that the effect of using 4MALITY produced a statistically significant increase in post-test scores. We explored student performance, help-seeking behavior and meta-cognitive strategies by gender and math ability and report these results.

Keywords

personalizing help intelligent tutoring systems problem-solving strategies 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leena Razzaq
    • 1
  • Robert W. Maloy
    • 1
  • Sharon Edwards
    • 1
  • David Marshall
    • 1
  • Ivon Arroyo
    • 1
  • Beverly P. Woolf
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Massachusetts AmherstAmherstUSA

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