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Bioleaching of Shale – Impact of Carbon Source

  • Viktor Sjöberg
  • Anna Grandin
  • Lovisa Karlsson
  • Stefan Karlsson
Part of the Springer Geology book series (SPRINGERGEOL)

Abstract

Bioleaching is often used for processing low-grade shale feedstock and the microbial community used for that purpose is supplied with nutrients such as sugar and/or Fe2+. In the present study, the leaching efficiency was tested when crushed weathered shale was mixed with aspen wood shavings and kept moist, at the mixtures field capacity. The purpose was to investigate whether a more complex carbon source and a lower content of water may be a feasible way of lowering the cost for bioleaching. After 56 days of incubation the amount of uranium mobilized from the shale reached some 1.7% with a minimum of effort and cost.

Keywords

Black Shale Wood Shaving Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans Heterotrophic Microorganism Water Field Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Viktor Sjöberg
    • 1
  • Anna Grandin
    • 1
  • Lovisa Karlsson
    • 1
  • Stefan Karlsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Man-Technology-Environment Research CentreÖrebro UniversityÖrebroSweden

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