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Effect of Weak Hyperopia on Stereoscopic Vision

  • Masako Omori
  • Asei Sugiyama
  • Hiroki Hori
  • Tomoki Shiomi
  • Tetsuya Kanda
  • Akira Hasegawa
  • Hiromu Ishio
  • Hiroki Takada
  • Satoshi Hasegawa
  • Masaru Miyao
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6773)

Abstract

Convergence, accommodation and pupil diameter were measured simultaneously while subjects were watching 3D images. The subjects were middle-aged and had weak hyperopia. WAM-5500 and EMR-9 were combined to make an original apparatus for the measurements. It was confirmed that accommodation and pupil diameter changed synchronously with convergence. These findings suggest that with naked vision the pupil is constricted and the depth of field deepened, acting like a compensation system for weak accommodation power. This suggests that people in middle age can view 3D images more easily if positive (convex lens) correction is made.

Keywords

convergence accommodation pupil diameter middle age 3D image 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masako Omori
    • 1
  • Asei Sugiyama
    • 2
  • Hiroki Hori
    • 3
  • Tomoki Shiomi
    • 3
  • Tetsuya Kanda
    • 3
  • Akira Hasegawa
    • 3
  • Hiromu Ishio
    • 4
  • Hiroki Takada
    • 5
  • Satoshi Hasegawa
    • 6
  • Masaru Miyao
    • 4
  1. 1.Facility of Home ErgonomicsKobe Women’s UniversityKobe-cityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Information Engineering, School of EngineeringNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Information EngineeringNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  4. 4.Graduate School of Information ScienceNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  5. 5.Graduate School of Engineering, Human and Artificial Intelligent SystemsUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan
  6. 6.Department of Information and Media StudiesNagoya Bunri UniversityInazawa-cityJapan

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