Metamodel Dependencies for Executable Models

  • Carlos Rodríguez
  • Mario Sánchez
  • Jorge Villalobos
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6705)

Abstract

Cumbia is our platform to develop applications based on multiple, coordinated executable models which can be described using different languages. The coordination of models is achieved by describing how their elements should interact, and mapping those descriptions into low level coordination primitives. Moreover, the description of the coordination is described externally: it does not have an impact either on the metamodels or on the models, and this results in lower coupling and increased flexibility. This approach, which is appropriate when the metamodels are highly independent, has limitations when it comes to describing dependencies that are inherent to the concerns. In those cases, it makes sense to incorporate those dependencies into the metamodels descriptions. The goal of this paper is thus to discuss two alternative ways to establish those dependencies, and illustrate their usage, benefits, and drawbacks in a concrete example.

Keywords

Metamodel relations Model relations Executable models Model composition Cumbia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlos Rodríguez
    • 1
  • Mario Sánchez
    • 1
  • Jorge Villalobos
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad de los AndesBogotáColombia

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