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Transferring Teaching to Testing – An Unexplored Aspect of Teachable Agents

  • Björn Sjödén
  • Betty Tärning
  • Lena Pareto
  • Agneta Gulz
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6738)

Abstract

The present study examined whether socio-motivational effects from working with a Teachable Agent (TA) might transfer from the formative learning phase to a summative test situation. Forty-nine students (9-10 years old) performed a digital pretest of math skills, then played a TA-based educational math game in school over a period of eight weeks. Thereafter, the students were divided into two groups, matched according to their pretest scores, and randomly assigned one of two posttest conditions: either with the TA present, or without the TA. Results showed that low-performers on the pretest improved significantly more on the posttest than did high-performers, but only when tested with the TA. We reason that low-performers might be more susceptible to a supportive social context – as provided by their TA – for performing well in a test situation.

Keywords

Learning-by-teaching teachable agent assessment transfer 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Björn Sjödén
    • 1
  • Betty Tärning
    • 1
  • Lena Pareto
    • 2
  • Agneta Gulz
    • 1
  1. 1.Lund University Cognitive ScienceSweden
  2. 2.Media Production and Informatics DepartmentsUniversity WestSweden

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