Designing Shared Public Display Networks – Implications from Today’s Paper-Based Notice Areas

  • Florian Alt
  • Nemanja Memarovic
  • Ivan Elhart
  • Dominik Bial
  • Albrecht Schmidt
  • Marc Langheinrich
  • Gunnar Harboe
  • Elaine Huang
  • Marcello P. Scipioni
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6696)

Abstract

Large public displays have become a regular conceptual element in many shops and businesses, where they advertise products or highlight upcoming events. In our work, we are interested in exploring how these isolated display solutions can be interconnected to form a single large network of public displays, thus supporting novel forms of sharing access to display real estate. In order to explore the feasibility of this vision, we investigated today’s practices surrounding shared notice areas, i.e. places where customers and visitors can put up event posters and classifieds, such as shop windows or notice boards. In particular, we looked at the content posted to such areas, the means for sharing it (i.e., forms of content control), and the reason for providing the shared notice area. Based on two-week long photo logs and a number of in-depth interviews with providers of such notice areas, we provide a systematic assessment of factors that inhibit or promote the shared use of public display space, ultimately leading to a set of concrete design implication for providing future digital versions of such public notice areas in the form of networked public displays.

Keywords

public display observation advertising 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian Alt
    • 1
  • Nemanja Memarovic
    • 2
  • Ivan Elhart
    • 2
  • Dominik Bial
    • 1
  • Albrecht Schmidt
    • 4
  • Marc Langheinrich
    • 2
  • Gunnar Harboe
    • 3
  • Elaine Huang
    • 3
  • Marcello P. Scipioni
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany
  2. 2.University of LuganoLuganoSwitzerland
  3. 3.University of ZürichZürichSwitzerland
  4. 4.University of StuttgartStuttgartGermany

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