Design Considerations for Assistive Platforms in Ambient Computing for Disabled People - Wheelchair in an Ambient Environment

  • Marwa Hassan
  • Imad Mougharbel
  • Nada Meskawi
  • Jean-Yves Tigli
  • Michel Riveill
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6719)

Abstract

A new architecture is suggested in this paper for an Assistive Platform in an Ambient Computing for elderly or disabled people. In this situation, interaction between the user, the environment and the platform is guided by means of a generated process. Depending on the context, the elements of the process are dynamically assembled. The aspect of assembly is based on rules that are set through an online learning operation. This new approach of designing an assistive platform is validated through devices integrated in a powered wheelchair with those implemented within the environment. Rules of operation evolve depending on a data base which is continuously updated depending on user’s daily activities.

Keywords

Disabled elderly assistive ambient computing aspect of assembly 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marwa Hassan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Imad Mougharbel
    • 1
  • Nada Meskawi
    • 1
  • Jean-Yves Tigli
    • 2
  • Michel Riveill
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of EngineeringLebanese UniversityHadathLebanon
  2. 2.Nice University Sophia Antipolis, Polytech’NiceFrance

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