Advertisement

A Methodology for Developing Accessible Mobile Platforms over Leading Devices for Visually Impaired People

  • Patricia Arroba
  • Juan Carlos Vallejo
  • Álvaro Araujo
  • David Fraga
  • José M. Moya
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 6693)

Abstract

Mobile user interfaces are moving to new touchscreen technologies setting new barriers for the blind. Many solutions and designs have been proposed but none is complete for the vast heterogeneous variety of devices.

In this paper, we present a methodology for developing an accessible-to-blind platform based on the principles that visually impaired people should be able to access leading technology and no specific hardware should be necessary for it. Besides, our solution provides input and output methods adapted to any underlying hardware as proof of concept and a guidelines for developing mobile platforms and applications.

Keywords

Mobile Platform Haptic Feedback Blind People Screen Reader Mobile User Interface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    The New York Times: Laptop sales help Apple top forecasts (2010), http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/26/technology/companies/26appleearn.html
  2. 2.
    Hughes, N.: AppleInsider: Piper: 15.8M US iPhone sales in 2010, even without Verizon (2010), http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/01/06/piper_15_8m_us_iphone_sales_in_2010_even_without_verizon.html
  3. 3.
    Engadget: Andy Rubin: over 300,000 Android phones activated daily (2010), http://www.engadget.com/2010/12/09/andy-rubin-over-300-000-android-phones-activated-daily/
  4. 4.
    American Foundation for the Blind: Living with Vision Loss (2010), http://www.afb.org/
  5. 5.
    Open Handset Alliance (2010), http://www.openhandsetalliance.com/
  6. 6.
    Vanderheiden, G.C.: Use of Audio-Haptic Interface Techniques to Allow Nonvisual Access to Touchscreen Appliances. In: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Proceedings, vol. 40(1), pp. 1266–1266 (1996)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bigham, J.P., Prince, C.M., Ladner, R.E.: WebAnywhere: a screen reader on-the-go. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Cross-disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility (W4A), pp. 73–82 (2008)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bonner, M., Brudvik, J., Abowd, G., Edwards, W.: No-Look Notes: Accessible Eyes-Free Multi-touch Text Entry. Pervasive Computing, 409–426 (2010)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kane, S.K., Bigham, J.P., Wobbrock, J.O.: Slide rule: making mobile touch screens accessible to blind people using multi-touch interaction techniques. In: Proceedings of the 10th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, pp. 73–80 (2010)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Apple, Inc.: VoiceOver: Accessibility solution for iPhone (2010), http://www.apple.com/accessibility/iphone/vision.htm
  11. 11.
    ONCE: Centro de Investigación, Desarrollo y Aplicación Tiflotécnica, http://cidat.once.es

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Arroba
    • 1
  • Juan Carlos Vallejo
    • 1
  • Álvaro Araujo
    • 1
  • David Fraga
    • 1
  • José M. Moya
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Ingeniería Electrónica ETSI TelecomunicaciónUniversidad Politécnica de MadridSpain

Personalised recommendations