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Introduction

  • Heino PrinzEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The analysis of quantitative data in biochemistry usually requires the calculation of theoretical models. Their analytical solutions are functions given as explicit formulas
$$ {\hbox{y }} = {\hbox{f(x)}} $$

Notes

Acknowledgments

This book has been written in the Max-Planck-Institute for molecular physiology in Dortmund and owes to its stimulating scientific environment. Part of this book was presented as a lecture to its IMPRS students http://www.imprs-cb.mpg.de/. They asked important questions so that an improved course could be taught to students and faculty of the Suranaree University of Technology http://www.sut.ac.th. This led to the development of a teaching course. Alexander Fieroch introduced me to the free world of GNU software, and thus provided the stimulus to write a textbook on numerical methods. He wrote the instructions to download GNU Octave for Mac and Linux operating systems, which is provided in the appendix.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AG Biochemische AnalytikMax-Planck-Institut für molekulare PhysiologieDortmundGermany

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